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The Berkshire Express (2005)
Jiminy Peak Mountain Resort
Hancock, Massachusetts
Status: Open
First Season:1948-49
Vertical Drop:1150 feet
Standing Lifts:1 high speed six pack, 2 quads, 3 triples, 1 double, surface lifts
Past Lifts:3 doubles, surface lifts
Left: The Berkshire Express (2005)
Recent NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News:
11/8/2017: Massachusetts 2017-18 Lift Ticket Prices Up 2%
11/21/2016: Massachusetts 2016-17 Lift Ticket Prices Up 3%
10/28/2015: Jiminy Peak Solar Farm Goes Online
4/17/2015: Jiminy Peak to Install Solar Farm
SkiNewEngland.net Profile
Located on the north face of Potter Mountain near the Massachusetts-New York border, Jiminy Peak is one of the most popular ski areas in Southern New England.

Building a Ski Area on Potter Mountain

Founders John Clark, John Fisher, and John Drummond in 1947
Founders John Clark, John Fisher, and John Drummond in 1947

Berkshire Museum science curator, World War II veteran, ski photographer, and Mt. Greylock Ski Club charter member Bartlett Hendricks reportedly spent much of the 1930s and early 1940s searching for a tract of land that would be ideal for a ski area. Circa 1942 or 1943, Hendricks acquired the Corey farm property, which was considered a snow bowl. Four years later, Hendricks agreed to lease the property to John Clark, John Drummond, and John Fisher, a trio of World War II veterans who lived in Connecticut. On July 29, 1947, the trio formed Jiminy Peak, Inc.

In July 1947, the trio announced plans to open the ski area for the 1947-48 season with a T-Bar and three rope tows. Fisher, owner of Catamount's, resided with Drummond in an Army surplus tent at Jiminy Peak that summer as they wielded chainsaws and bulldozers. Trails cut included the novice Jiminy Cricket (below the planned T-Bar), the due north facing Slope 360, and Slingshot (inspired by a maple tree in the middle of the slope), the names chosen during a post-workday horseshoe game.

Unfortunately for the group, the shipment of steel for the T-Bar did not arrive in time for the winter, postponing the debut of the ski area. The steel finally arrived in June 1948. By October, the T-Bar was up and preliminary testing complete. Meanwhile, rope tows were acquired from Farnams ski area in Cheshire, which had decided to cease operating.

Jiminy Peak Opens

The upper T-Bar
The upper T-Bar

Jiminy Peak unofficially opened on Christmas Day of 1948, as one of the rope tows operated on minimal snow cover. Though the T-Bar did open that winter, operations were limited by inadequate snowpack and mechanical problems. The $80,000, 750 vertical foot ski area's T-Bar was the first of its type in all of Southern New England. A pair of rope tows served the lower mountain and Jimmy Cricket slope. From the top of the tows, one could then cross over to a small lodge and the T-Bar. From the T-Bar, one could ski Merry-Go-Round, Whirlaway, 360 Slope, and Slingshot. A lack of snowfall resulted in the area closing before spring skiing season.

The 1949-50 season started on rope tows during the first weekend in December, which the Berkshire Eagle noted as the earliest lift served skiing in the region's history. Though the season extended into late March, snow cover was still an issue. As a result, the owners reported planting 4,000 evergreen trees that spring.

1950-51 was another struggle, with limited skiing in December and many missed weekends thereafter. After weeks of reporting inadequate snow cover, Jiminy Peak reported the best conditions of the season as spring started, only to have it washed out by heavy rains a day later.

Further trail improvements were made for the 1951-52 season, which spanned from mid December to the end of March, resulting in 64 days of operation and record attendance.

Improvements for the 1952-53 season included another rope tow, as well as further trail widening and smoothing. Mother Nature did not cooperate, resulting in three straight January openings and seasons that were averaging only about 30 operating days. After this string of rough seasons, Jiminy Peak underwent significant changes in the spring of 1955, as John Clark sold his stake in the company and John Drummond stepped down as manager. In his place, former Mt. Greylock Ski Club President George "Doc" Maynard took over as managing director. A Pittsfield resident, Maynard had been involved in the development of the Thunderbolt Trail on Mt. Greylock and was involved in ski racing organizations.

1955-56 had a more seasonable start and extended into mid-April, giving Jiminy Peak its most successful season yet. Despite the financial boon, no major investments were made during the off season, while operations were cut back to Friday-Sunday for the following season. Meanwhile, Bousquet installed a new T-Bar, complemented with snowmaking, while Catamount followed suit one year later. As a result, when the 1957-58 season started with a snow drought, Bousquet had skiing in mid-December while Jiminy Peak did not open until January 10.

After further struggles in relying upon natural snow, John Fisher announced in the spring of 1959 that he was taking over as manager and major investments would be made. $80,000 was invested in a new lower mountain T-Bar, a snowmaking system, and an 85 foot long greenhouse base structure named the Glasshaus Lodge. The snowmaking system paid immediate dividends as Jiminy Peak was able to open prior to Christmas for the next five seasons, setting a new record for the area.

Though Jiminy Peak had momentarily caught up with the pack with the installation of snowmaking, it quickly fell behind again as chairlifts began popping up throughout Western Massachusetts, including at Fisher's Catamount ski area in 1961. Preparations for a chairlift at Jiminy Peak began in 1963, when a trail was cut from the top of the mountain. Catamount Ski School Director Toni Matt also managed the Jiminy Peak ski school for the 1963-64 season.

Fred Crane Takes Over and Installs a Chairlift

1964 Jiminy Peak expansion advertisement
1964 Jiminy Peak expansion advertisement

Following the 1963-64 season, Frederick G. Crane Jr. was elected president of Jiminy Peak, Inc., as John Fisher sold his Jiminy Peak shares and focused full time on Catamount. A fifth generation member of local paper manufacturer Crane & Company, Crane served was a Naval veteran of World War II. One of his first actions as president was to announce a major expansion project, to be completed that off season. A new Mueller double chairlift was installed to the top of Jiminy Peak, increasing the advertised vertical drop from 750 to 1,100 feet. New trails developed by Bartlett Hendricks included the expert Ace of Spades and intermediate Left Bank. A new base lodge was constructed, while daily operations resumed. "Doc" Maynard's son George was named business manager, while Roland Blood served as ski school director. Meanwhile, a new rival named Brodie Mountain was opened just up the road by Jim Kelly.

The summit double chairlift
The summit double chairlift

Snowmaking was expanded to the top of the upper T-Bar at Jiminy Peak for the 1968-69 season, thus providing 750 vertical feet of coverage. In addition, the popular Whirlaway trail was rebuilt and widened, bypassing a section referred to as the "terrible traverse." Despite the improvements, Jiminy Peak was still primitive, as stated in Skiing magazine, "Manager Maynard and Fred Crane Jr., president of the corporation, oversee the operation as their fathers once did back in the '50's." The base lodge still had a gravel floor.

Brian Fairbank Takes Over and Installs a Chairlift

The Jiminy Peak base area in the 1970s
The Jiminy Peak base area in the 1970s

Reportedly at the behest of Crane & Company wanting Fred Crane to focus on one business, New York's Kissing Bridge, Inc. took over management of the area in 1969, installing 23 year old Brian Fairbank as Manager on July 7. Meanwhile, former Dutch Hill managers Webb and Madelon Ottman had recently joined the staff. A $350,000 loan was taken out to install the Grand Slam double chairlift and night skiing.

Though the opening of the 1969-70 season was later than hoped due to delays in upgrading electric service, Jiminy Peak operated 109 days, resulting in what Fairbank reported as the best season in its history.

Jiminy Peak noticed its first ever November opening in 1970 and finished the season strong, putting a full court press on real estate development. Snowmaking was further leveraged in 1972, when the area recorded its first ever October opening. Mild weather followed, with the season all but done at the end of February. In March, Brian Fairbank told the Berkshire Eagle, "we hope our creditors will be patient."

Unfortunately, 1973-74 was an even worse winter. Deeply in debt, Jiminy Peak reorganized, leveraging a Small Business Administration guarantee for a Berkshire Bank & Trust loan. Fairbank was named president, Hendricks exchanged land for shares, and Fred Crane became chairman of the board. Fairbank's uncle Perry was then named ski school director. Plans were made to develop real estate and off season offerings.

Former manager George "Doc" Maynard passed away in the fall of 1975 at the age of 75. An expert trail was added for the 1975-76 season, named after Jericho Valley (the original name of the town of Hancock). The Jericho trail is now legendary for its challenging steeps. Later in 1976, plans were made to install a summer attraction.

Tragedy struck on the morning of January 30, 1977, when the area's Riblet chairlift rolled backward for 71 seconds, resulting in 12 injuries. A subsequent investigation determined two screws had loosened, resulting in three brakes malfunctioning. Fairbank later reflected, "I thought seriously about quitting the ski business, but it was my whole life. But I knew I had to do something so that I could sleep at night." Repairs were made and procedures changed, placing the lift back in service one week later.

On May 28, 1977, the fifth alpine slide in the United States debuted at Jiminy Peak. Not only did the 2,890 foot long slide provide an off season attraction, but it also allowed Jiminy Peak to keep more employees on year round. The slide generated positive cashflow in its first year of operation with an estimated 130,000 rides.

A $600,000 expansion took place in 1978, as the aging T-Bars were replaced. The new lifts were Riblet double chairlifts, one of which was constructed to the summit. A new lodge was also introduced.

A Four Season Resort

The Jiminy Peak base area in the 1990s
The Jiminy Peak base area in the 1990s

Feeling the pain of the poor winters of the early 1980s, Jiminy Peak looked to improve its snow retention and conditioning. $100,000 was invested in grooming equipment for the 1981-82 season, while a new snow retention system was also tested. Invented by Jiminy Peak Director and Williamstown Steinerfilm, Inc. President Gordon Walters, "Sno Coat" was a series of 40 foot wide by 1,000 foot long plastic strips laid on snow much like a baseball field tarp. While the invention was credited with saving snow during an early season rain event, it was quietly abandoned.

Night skiing was likely expanded to the summit for the 1981-82 season. Two years later, the Mueller summit chairlift was replaced with a new Riblet triple chairlift. 1984 also resulted in the creation of a 10 year master plan, aimed at making Jiminy Peak a year round destination resort. Joseph O'Donnell of Boston Concessions Group was brought into the ownership group around this time.

The Jiminy Cricket slope was expanded by 50 percent for 1987-88 when a new Borvig J-Bar replaced the novice rope tow. Meanwhile, the Left Bank trail was lit for night skiing, resulting in Jiminy Peak calling it "the longest lighted trail in the East." The West Way trail was significantly widened for the following season.

While the 10 year plan was focused on real estate development and alternative activities, a major enhancement to the ski area was made near the completion of the campaign. The summit quad from recently closed Crotched Mountain was purchased by Jiminy Peak in 1992 and installed as the Q1 Quad. The first four person chairlift in Massachusetts, the new lift dramatically improved the uphill capacity.

Former Jiminy Peak president Fred Crane passed away at the age of 69 in November 1992, as a result of injuries sustained in a logging accident.

The recently installed Jiminy Cricket J-Bar was replaced for the 1996-97 season with a realigned, longer triple chairlift, providing better access to the slopes for recent real estate developments.

Widow White's, Brodie, and Berkshire Express

Jiminy Peak in 2015
Jiminy Peak in 2015

With the ski area continuing to draw large crowds, additional terrain was opened for the 1998-99 season. The upper mountain area, named Widow White's Peak, was served by a new fixed grip quad chairlift. One year later, Bartlett Hendricks' former home was hauled to the summit of the ski area and named Hendricks Lodge.

A significant amount of additional terrain was briefly introduced to Jiminy Peak starting in 1999, when the ownership purchased nearby Brodie Mountain. Following the sale, Jiminy Peak co-marketed Brodie and considered modernizing it.

Meanwhile, the lower mountain at Jiminy Peak was still served by lower capacity lifts. This was addressed for the 2000-2001 season, when the Exhibition double chairlift was replaced with the Berkshire Express, Southern New England's first high speed detachable six person chairlift. The other half of the former double-double chairlift was upgraded to a triple.

While $5 million had been earmarked for improvements at Brodie, the area was deemed not viable following the 2001-2002 season. Instead, Brodie was closed and the money was invested in the Village Center at Jiminy Peak. The investment in the base area was unveiled for the 2003-04 season when the Burbank Children's Center and Paul Major Welcome Center were constructed. The final part of the resort's master plan, the buildings included condominiums on the upper floors.

Bartlett Hendricks passed away on September 19, 2002 at the age of 92.

Jiminy Peak in 2019
Jiminy Peak in 2019

The three season business was further improved in 2006 when the second mountain coaster in the United States was installed at Jiminy Peak. Its success led to similar installations across New England in subsequent years.

In 2007, a 1.5 megawatt wind turbine was installed near the ski area, offsetting energy costs.

On January 27, 2009, co-owners Brian Fairbank and Joseph O'Donnell sold Jiminy Peak to CNL Lifestyle Properties for $27 million, while obtaining a 40 year operational lease of the ski area. In subsequent years, Brian Fairbank and his son Tyler took over operational control of Bromley and Cranmore, using Jiminy Peak as the model for base area development at the New Hampshire resort.

Jiminy Peak founder Jack Fisher passed away on June 14, 2011 at the age of 97.

After three years of development, 2.3 megawatt solar farm was constructed near the ski area in 2015. Energy consumption was then reduced on the mountain in 2016 and 2017, when night skiing light bulbs were replaced with new LED fixtures.


NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News
Recent Articles
Massachusetts 2017-18 Lift Ticket Prices Up 2% - Nov. 8, 2017
Massachusetts 2016-17 Lift Ticket Prices Up 3% - Nov. 21, 2016
Jiminy Peak Solar Farm Goes Online - Oct. 28, 2015
Jiminy Peak to Install Solar Farm - Apr. 17, 2015
Ski Areas Opening Across New England - Nov. 14, 2014
Jiminy Peak Mountain Resort NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News Page

Expansion History
Project
Season
Summit
Open
1964-65
Widow White's Peak
Open
1998-99

Image Gallery
1953-54 Eastern Ski Map1954-55 Eastern Ski Map1955-56 Eastern Ski Map1956-57 Eastern Ski Map1957-58 Eastern Ski Map1959-60 Eastern Ski Map
View All Images in Jiminy Peak Mountain Resort Image Gallery



Lifts
Click on lift name for information and photos
Standing Lifts
Installed
The Berkshire Express in 2002
Berkshire Express
Garaventa CTEC
Chairlift - Sixpack - Detachable
2000-01
The Cricket Triple in 2002
Cricket Triple
Partek
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1996-97
The Grand Slam Double in 2002
Grand Slam
Riblet
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1969-70
The bottom terminal (right) (2010s)
Novice Triple
Riblet
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
2000-01
The Q1 Quad in 2016
Q1 Quad
CTEC
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1992-93
The Summit Triple in the 1980s
Summit Triple
Riblet
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1983-84
Widow White's Quad in 2005
Widow White's Quad
Garaventa CTEC
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1998-99

Past Lifts
Seasons
The Exhibition Double (right) circa 1981
Exhibition Double
Riblet
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1978-79
-
1999-00
The J-Bar circa the late 1980s
J-Bar
Borvig
J-Bar
1987-88
-
1995-96
Lower T-Bar
Hall
T-Bar
1959-60
-
1977-78
The Novice Double (left) circa 1981
Novice Double
Riblet
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1978-79
-
1999-00
The Summit Double in the 1970s
Summit Double
Mueller
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1964-65
-
1982-83
The Upper T-Bar at Jiminy Peak circa the 1950s or 1960s
Upper T-Bar
Constam
T-Bar
1948-49
-
1977-78

Maps
1962-63 Jiminy Peak Trail Map1964-65 Jiminy Peak Trail Map1967-68 Jiminy Peak Trail Map1968-69 Jiminy Peak Trail Map1969-70 Jiminy Peak trail map1970-71 Jiminy Peak Trail Map
View All Jiminy Peak Mountain Resort Trail Maps

Year by Year History
Adult Weekend Full Day Lift Ticket; Adult Full Price Unlimited Season Pass
2020s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2019-20$84.002019-20 Ticket Price Graph$1080.002019-20 Season Pass Price Graph12.9 daysNovember 162019-20 Skier Visit Graph
2010s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2018-19$81.002018-19 Ticket Price Graph$1050.002018-19 Season Pass Price Graph13.0 daysNovember 17April 72018-19 Skier Visit Graph
2017-18$76.002017-18 Ticket Price Graph$1013.002017-18 Season Pass Price Graph13.3 daysNovember 12April 82017-18 Skier Visit Graph
2016-17$74.002016-17 Ticket Price Graph$1013.002016-17 Season Pass Price Graph13.7 daysNovember 25April 92016-17 Skier Visit Graph
2015-16$71.002015-16 Ticket Price Graph$965.002015-16 Season Pass Price Graph13.6 daysNovember 27March 202015-16 Skier Visit Graph
2014-15$69.002014-15 Ticket Price Graph$935.002014-15 Season Pass Price Graph13.6 daysNovember 16April 122014-15 Skier Visit Graph
2013-14$67.002013-14 Ticket Price Graph$910.002013-14 Season Pass Price Graph13.6 daysNovember 16April 62013-14 Skier Visit Graph
2012-13$61.002012-13 Ticket Price Graph$875.002012-13 Season Pass Price Graph14.3 daysNovember 10April 72012-13 Skier Visit Graph
2011-12$61.002011-12 Ticket Price Graph$875.002011-12 Season Pass Price Graph14.3 daysDecember 10March 182011-12 Skier Visit Graph
2010-11$59.002010-11 Ticket Price Graph$875.002010-11 Season Pass Price Graph14.8 daysNovember 27April 10270,8452010-11 Skier Visit Graph
2009-102009-10 Ticket Price Graph2009-10 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 12April 32009-10 Skier Visit Graph
2000s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2008-09$56.002008-09 Ticket Price Graph$849.002008-09 Season Pass Price Graph15.2 daysNovember 22April 5270,9512008-09 Skier Visit Graph
2007-08$59.002007-08 Ticket Price Graph$799.002007-08 Season Pass Price Graph13.5 daysNovember 17April 6255,3872007-08 Skier Visit Graph
2006-07$57.002006-07 Ticket Price Graph$799.002006-07 Season Pass Price Graph14.0 daysNovember 242006-07 Skier Visit Graph
2005-06$55.002005-06 Ticket Price Graph$759.002005-06 Season Pass Price Graph13.8 daysNovember 25April 22005-06 Skier Visit Graph
2004-05$52.002004-05 Ticket Price Graph$759.002004-05 Season Pass Price Graph14.6 daysNovember 13April 172004-05 Skier Visit Graph
2003-04$52.002003-04 Ticket Price Graph$699.002003-04 Season Pass Price Graph13.4 daysNovember 15April 112003-04 Skier Visit Graph
2002-03$49.002002-03 Ticket Price Graph$699.002002-03 Season Pass Price Graph14.3 daysNovember 9April 132002-03 Skier Visit Graph
2001-02$48.002001-02 Ticket Price Graph2001-02 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 9April 12001-02 Skier Visit Graph
2000-01$46.002000-01 Ticket Price Graph2000-01 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 24250,0002000-01 Skier Visit Graph
1999-00$44.001999-00 Ticket Price Graph1999-00 Season Pass Price GraphMarch 261999-00 Skier Visit Graph
1990s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1998-99$42.001998-99 Ticket Price Graph1998-99 Season Pass Price Graph1998-99 Skier Visit Graph
1997-981997-98 Ticket Price Graph1997-98 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 151997-98 Skier Visit Graph
1996-97$38.001996-97 Ticket Price Graph1996-97 Season Pass Price Graph1996-97 Skier Visit Graph
1995-96$38.001995-96 Ticket Price Graph1995-96 Season Pass Price Graph1995-96 Skier Visit Graph
1994-951994-95 Ticket Price Graph1994-95 Season Pass Price GraphApril 91994-95 Skier Visit Graph
1992-93$35.001992-93 Ticket Price Graph1992-93 Season Pass Price Graph241,5201992-93 Skier Visit Graph
1991-92$34.001991-92 Ticket Price Graph1991-92 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 291991-92 Skier Visit Graph
1990-91$33.001990-91 Ticket Price Graph1990-91 Season Pass Price Graph1990-91 Skier Visit Graph
1989-90$30.001989-90 Ticket Price Graph1989-90 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 241989-90 Skier Visit Graph
1980s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1988-89$30.001988-89 Ticket Price Graph1988-89 Season Pass Price Graph1988-89 Skier Visit Graph
1987-88$28.001987-88 Ticket Price Graph1987-88 Season Pass Price Graph1987-88 Skier Visit Graph
1986-871986-87 Ticket Price Graph1986-87 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 28190,0001986-87 Skier Visit Graph
1985-86$25.001985-86 Ticket Price Graph1985-86 Season Pass Price Graph1985-86 Skier Visit Graph
1984-85$21.001984-85 Ticket Price Graph1984-85 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 221984-85 Skier Visit Graph
1982-83$19.001982-83 Ticket Price Graph1982-83 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 241982-83 Skier Visit Graph
1981-82$17.001981-82 Ticket Price Graph1981-82 Season Pass Price Graph1981-82 Skier Visit Graph
1980-81$15.001980-81 Ticket Price Graph1980-81 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 151980-81 Skier Visit Graph
1979-80$14.001979-80 Ticket Price Graph1979-80 Season Pass Price Graph1979-80 Skier Visit Graph
1970s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1978-79$13.001978-79 Ticket Price Graph1978-79 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 231978-79 Skier Visit Graph
1977-78$12.001977-78 Ticket Price Graph1977-78 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 271977-78 Skier Visit Graph
1976-77$11.001976-77 Ticket Price Graph$160.001976-77 Season Pass Price Graph14.5 daysNovember 11March 271976-77 Skier Visit Graph
1975-76$10.001975-76 Ticket Price Graph1975-76 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 271975-76 Skier Visit Graph
1974-75$9.001974-75 Ticket Price Graph1974-75 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 23April 131974-75 Skier Visit Graph
1973-74$9.001973-74 Ticket Price Graph1973-74 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 7March 2450,0001973-74 Skier Visit Graph
1972-73$9.001972-73 Ticket Price Graph1972-73 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 201972-73 Skier Visit Graph
1971-72$9.001971-72 Ticket Price Graph1971-72 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 26April 91971-72 Skier Visit Graph
1970-71$8.001970-71 Ticket Price Graph1970-71 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 26April 111970-71 Skier Visit Graph
1969-70$8.001969-70 Ticket Price Graph1969-70 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 19April 121969-70 Skier Visit Graph
1960s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1968-69$7.001968-69 Ticket Price Graph1968-69 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 11April 61968-69 Skier Visit Graph
1967-68$7.001967-68 Ticket Price Graph1967-68 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 2March 171967-68 Skier Visit Graph
1966-67$7.001966-67 Ticket Price Graph1966-67 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 3April 21966-67 Skier Visit Graph
1965-66$6.001965-66 Ticket Price Graph1965-66 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 18March 201965-66 Skier Visit Graph
1964-65$6.001964-65 Ticket Price Graph$75.001964-65 Season Pass Price Graph12.5 daysDecember 30April 41964-65 Skier Visit Graph
1963-64$4.001963-64 Ticket Price Graph1963-64 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 14March 221963-64 Skier Visit Graph
1962-63$4.001962-63 Ticket Price Graph1962-63 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 151962-63 Skier Visit Graph
1961-62$4.001961-62 Ticket Price Graph1961-62 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 221961-62 Skier Visit Graph
1960-61$4.001960-61 Ticket Price Graph1960-61 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 17March 261960-61 Skier Visit Graph
1959-60$4.001959-60 Ticket Price Graph1959-60 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 20March 281959-60 Skier Visit Graph
1950s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1958-591958-59 Ticket Price Graph1958-59 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 201958-59 Skier Visit Graph
1957-581957-58 Ticket Price Graph1957-58 Season Pass Price GraphJanuary 10April 61957-58 Skier Visit Graph
1955-561955-56 Ticket Price Graph1955-56 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 17April 151955-56 Skier Visit Graph
1954-551954-55 Ticket Price Graph1954-55 Season Pass Price GraphJanuary 22March 271954-55 Skier Visit Graph
1953-541953-54 Ticket Price Graph1953-54 Season Pass Price GraphJanuary 81953-54 Skier Visit Graph
1952-53$3.001952-53 Ticket Price Graph1952-53 Season Pass Price GraphJanuary 41952-53 Skier Visit Graph
1951-52$3.001951-52 Ticket Price Graph1951-52 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 16March 301951-52 Skier Visit Graph
1950-51$3.001950-51 Ticket Price Graph1950-51 Season Pass Price Graph1950-51 Skier Visit Graph
1949-50$3.001949-50 Ticket Price Graph1949-50 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 3March 261949-50 Skier Visit Graph
1940s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1948-49$3.001948-49 Ticket Price Graph1948-49 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 25March 201948-49 Skier Visit Graph

Visitor Memories
"Anyone remember Mr. 360? He was in a shack at the top of one of the trails and would ride down the mountain at the end of the day standing on a shovel."
Paul Larsen, Feb. 24, 2016
"On a trip from Delaware to New England a couple of years ago I stopped off on my way home and had a great day. I do not need a big mountain to have a great day. This resort is a great family resort. I will do this Mountain againJon OsbornOSBORN2SKI"
Jon Osborn, Aug. 19, 2014
"I would like to have the original history of the land sold. My Grandfather John Adams was the one who sold the land to the future owner of Jiminy Peak. If you look up original records you will find this true. My uncle continues to own land close to Jiminy Peak. We continue to be loggers in that area."
Shelly Ravenscraft, Apr. 14, 2013
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External Links
  • Jiminy Peak Mountain Resort official site
  • Last updated: November 21, 2019

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