NewEnglandSkiHistory.com
CT
|
MA
|
ME
|
NH
|
RI
|
VT
SkiNewEngland.net
 
The upper base area at Mt. Sunapee (2004)
Mount Sunapee Resort
Newbury, New Hampshire
Status: Open
First Season:1948-49
Vertical Drop:1510 feet
Standing Lifts:2 high speed quads, 1 quads, 2 triples, surface lifts
Past Lifts:1 quad, 1 triple, 5 doubles, 1 single, surface lifts
Left: The upper base area at Mt. Sunapee (2004)
Recent NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News:
1/3/2019: Sunapee Retires the Duckling Double
12/20/2018: Mount Sunapee West Bowl Expansion Re-App...
11/26/2018: Musical Chairs at Vail and Pacific Owned...
9/26/2018: Vail Acquisition of Sunapee Lease Approv...
SkiNewEngland.net Profile
Located in southwestern New Hampshire, the Sunapee region has been a well-known vacation destination for centuries. Key attractions in the region include Lake Sunapee and 2,726 foot Sunapee Mountain (also known as Mount Sunapee).

Early 1940s Aerial Tramway Proposal

Downhill skiing activity on Sunapee dates back to 1933, when the Civilian Conservation Corps constructed the Newport Ski Trail on the eastern side of the mountain. Built under the supervision of the Newport Ski Club, the trail dropped some 1,500 vertical feet to the Newbury railroad station. The trail was partially relocated in the late 1930s by the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests and Newport Ski Club and was renamed the Newbury Ski Trail.

Meanwhile, following the installation of the aerial tramway on Cannon Mountain in 1938, Lake Sunapee area residents attempted to develop an aerial tramway served ski area on Sunapee Mountain. Though the lift project made significant strides in 1940 and 1941, the onset of World War II stopped it dead in its tracks.

A Chairlift on North Peak

Mt. Sunapee in 1948
Mt. Sunapee in 1948

With development costs increasing, a scaled down version of the proposal of a state owned and operated ski area emerged following the war. Noting that an access road from Newbury was not ideal, the State Highway Department proposed constructing a road to the ski area on the northwest side of the mountain. A three-stage construction plan was introduced during the summer of 1947, starting with the construction of a 1,000 vertical foot single chairlift to North Peak. Stage two would involve relocating the chairlift to run from the top of North peak to the summit and installing a Skimobile in its place. Stage three would be construction of a T-Bar serving a bowl on the north side of the mountain. Stage one operations were forecast to generate a $37,000 per year profit.

By late fall, the state put the North Peak chairlift out to bid, receiving bids from Roebling and American Steel & Wire Company.

The $375,000 project moved forward in the spring of 1948, as the State of New Hampshire announced Roebling would fabricate the lift, while Hutchinson Building and Lumber Company of Concord would construct it. Allan Beck of Beck and Belluci head up installation of the lift towers. The Cyril J. Bernier Company of Contoocook cleared the lift line, while the New Hampshire State Highway Department began clearing trails in July of 1948 with engineers (and skiers) Malcolm Chase and Fred Hansen leading the project and Joe Kenick (who had worked the construction of Belknap and Cannon) serving as superintendent.

By the end of September, the access road and 350-car parking lot had been built, while the chairlift was two-thirds complete. At least one second-hand rope tow was procured later that fall (two rope tows were installed).

Manager David Heald scheduled an extravagant grand opening for the day after Christmas, with plans to have Walter Prager (former World Champion skier and Dartmouth ski coach) carried to the slopes via helicopter for a first descent.

Opening Struggles

The North Peak single chairlift
The North Peak single chairlift

Unfortunately for Sunapee, the opening coincided with the first of many winters of poor snowfall. With very little snow on the ground, Prager's ceremonial first run was cancelled. 5,000 people attended opening day, which was limited to scenic chairlift rides. Governor Charles Dale cut the ceremonial ribbon for the chairlift, which carried an estimated 500 riders that day. Parks and Recreation Commissioner Walter R. Brown was the first official passenger on the lift.

In addition to manager Dave Heald, opening season staff included Mal Mackenzie as ski school director, Warren Sanborn in charge of the restaurant, and Dick Parker in charge of the ski patrol. Skiing likely did not get underway until late January. The rope tow slopes were generally open, as was the Hansen-Chase trail, however the novice trail from the chairlift did not debut until later in the winter. The expert Flying Goose also struggled to stay open due to recurring rain.

Following the first ski season, a new picnic area debuted, as well as summer chairlift rides. Visitors could have refreshments on the top of the mountain, access a series of hiking trails, and even fish for trout in a pond near the bottom of the lift. Special clambakes on the summit were also a big draw. The tally for lift rides that summer and fall was 45,000.

Two more trails were added for the second season - the Beck Brook trail for novices and Lynx for experts (which may not have been complete that year) - while a 300 car parking lot was added and a snow cat procured. Ironically, the December 26th first anniversary bash was much like the grand opening - no skiing was possible. Nevertheless, a 6 foot, 14 layer birthday cake was cut and fireworks launched, with a crowd of 2,000 on hand. Skiing didn't get underway until January. Despite projections of profits, Mt. Sunapee had a cumulative $40,360 operating loss by the end of the 1949-50 season.

Sunapee circa the 1950s
Sunapee circa the 1950s

The Lynx trail was completed for the 1950-51 season, while the Beck Brook trail was widened and regraded. The first half of that season was more of the same for Mt. Sunapee, as little quality skiing was to be had in December or January. Things were so bad that agricultural engineers Phil and Joe Tropeano set up an experimental sample snowmaking system on one of the slopes. Struggles with the experimental system included frozen valves in cold weather and the loss of snow in warm weather. Nevertheless, the Tropeanos would later form Larchmont Engineering and have success selling their systems across the region. Sunapee, on the other hand, would not have a permanent snowmaking system until three decades later.

Months later, during November 1951 maintenance, Mt. Sunapee staff learned the single chairlift needed significant repairs. A frantic effort was made to replace the haul rope and sheave components in time for the season, including a round-the-clock work schedule and a transportation effort by the highway department. Though the unexpected repair work seemed like an ominous start, the winter of 1951-52 had good natural snowfall, resulting in a record season extending into April. Following the season, manager Dave Heald was named executive director of the New Hampshire Publicity Bureau. Dick Parker, Heald's assistant manager for the past season, took over as area manager. Prior to Mt. Sunapee's lift served operations, Parker was involved with the Newport Ski Club when it constructed ski trails on the mountain. In addition to his ski patrol credentials, Parker worked as a ski instructor for Otto Schneibs and served overseas in the Army for 44 months during World War II.

Though the 1952-53 had another December opening, a trend of early springs started, resulting in the relocation of the Eastern Junior Championships to Pinkham Notch. Following the season, Governor Adams and the Executive Council approved $150,000 in state funds for the development of a new trail complex at Mt. Sunapee.

A Sno-Bowl in the Sun

The Sno-Bowl circa the 1950s
The Sno-Bowl circa the 1950s

Sunapee's first big expansion took place in 1953, when the Sno-Bowl, also known as the Hawes Hallett Slopes, and later known as the upper half of the Sun Bowl, was constructed. Designed in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Public Works and Highways, the new complex featured upper mountain terrain, accessible with a ride up the upgraded North Peak single chairlift. The full 700 vertical feet of new trails was served by a Heron-built Constam T-Bar, which was erected by the Sam Aceto Construction Company. A cafeteria "painted bright red" was also constructed in conjunction with the project, located at the base of the lift to enable skiers to "spend the whole day in the new development without returning to the park's base station area." Construction of the lift continued into late December, hampered material delays and by muddy conditions. The lift was dedicated on January 14, amidst another poor season with multiple rain-thaw periods. When conditions were favorable, Sunapee drew record crowds of 3,000 skiers. However, the season deteriorated quickly, with multiple races being postponed or cancelled due to a lack of snow. At times, season passholders were invited to ride the chairlift and walk between patches of snow. Nevertheless, the expansion helped boost Sunapee's profile, with the Boston Globe heralding the project as a "Skier's Dream Comes True." Art Keating served as ski school director.

The new T-Bar was considered as a savior during the first half of the 1954-55 season, as minimal snowfall once again prohibited most skiing on the rest of the slopes. The high elevation Sno-Bowl, on the other hand, was able to stay open through the holiday season. The area operated for 129 days that winter, though only 39 of those had "good" conditions. A new revenue record was set at $83,628.

The 1955-56 season had an early start on the rope tow slope, however a lack of snow delayed the opening of the main chairlift trails until January. Snow held thereafter, resulting in a season that lasted deep into April.

Sunapee started a three year trail-widening program in 1956, turning many of its original trails into boulevard slopes, starting with the lower Hansen Chase trail. Meanwhile, a new haul rope was installed on the single chairlift. The subpar 1956-57 season did not get underway until three days before Christmas. At times, some trails were kept closed to save snowpack for future weeks. By the start of March, little snow remained.

The North Peak single chairlift
The North Peak single chairlift

A Pomalift was installed on the "Senior Slopes" adjacent to the Flying Goose trail for the 1957-58 season, replacing an old rope tow. In addition, a new novice slope was cleared to skier's right of new Pomalift that year, served by dual rope tows. A new warming hut was constructed atop of the single chairlift, replacing one that reportedly burned in 1956. An early start and a strong spring resulted in record revenue for the state operated ski areas.

To handle the increasing crowds, a new $65,000 lodge was constructed at the base of the Pomalift Senior Slope for the 1958-59 season, housing a cafeteria, tickets, and the ski school. The existing base building retained the ski shop and a lounge. Meanwhile, Cannon Mountain ski school director Paul Valar took over the ski school from Art Keating, naming Otti Farrer as head instructor. The season was another successful one, running from December into early spring. The season also marked the inauguration of Governor Wesley Powell, who immediately advocated for more spending at Mt. Sunapee.

Though the 1959-60 season did not get underway until after Christmas, the area claimed 25,000 skier visits during the holiday week, including an all-time high of 3,200 on the Saturday after New Year's Day. Crowds continued to hit the slopes, resulting in a record $224,200 in revenue that winter.

For the 1960-61 season, a Roebling T-Bar was installed on the new 15 acre Elliott slope, boosting uphill capacity by 29 percent. The lift and slope were dedicated in February in honor Wilmer "Bill" Elliott, a prominent member of the Mt. Sunapee Area Ski Club who had passed away in April of 1958. Walter Graf took over as head instructor of the ski school for the 1960-61 season, which, aided by the continued construction of Interstate 89, once again set a record with $268,122 in revenue (despite below average snowfall).

The Summit T-Bar and North Peak Single were overhauled for the 1961-62 season, while the Beck Brook trail was widened and regraded. Meanwhile that fall, Governor Wesley Powell requested millions of dollars for upgrading key recreational facilities in the state, including Mt. Sunapee. In February, a two-year plan was unveiled that included significant upgrades in 1962, as well as plans to construct trails in the Johnson Farm Bowl to the east of North Peak. The proposal drew local opposition, as it included taking 140 acres of private land.

The proposal was briefly halted in March 1962, when Governor Powell suffered a heart attack. Nevertheless, he convened the Executive Council at his hospital at the end of the month and received unanimous approval for the first $1.2 million of state funds for what was to be a two-year investment in the state owned ski areas. Powell said he fought for the spending because the projects were "close to my heart."

Sunapee is Rebuilt

Summit chairlift in the 1960s
Summit chairlift in the 1960s

For 1962-63, $887,128 was invested in Mt. Sunapee, mainly in lift improvements. A double chair (with four-person gondola cars stored for summer use), was installed as the area's first top to bottom lift, crossing over a newly upgraded North Peak double. In addition, a third double chairlift, the Duckling, and a J-Bar (in what would become known as the Province Bowl) were installed, leveraging a helicopter to accelerate construction. New trails cut from the top of the new summit chair included Bonanza, Blast-Off, and Ridge. Capping off the spending was a $250,000 base lodge expansion.

The project was not without controversy, however. With the expanded facilities, the state proposed a 92% increase in the price of a season pass, drawing fire from elected officials. A compromise was made by putting in place a more gradual increase, augmented with family discounts and interchangeability with Cannon Mountain. Governor Powell defended the modified price increases by telling the Executive Council that "those who have screamed" for the upgrades shouldn't complain about the rates and that the state "should not backtrack any further on the prices." The expansion and new rate structure resulted in record season pass revenue.

While two double chairlifts were planned for the 1963-64 season, the phase two expansion was scaled back to cover a new access road. For 1964-65, $210,000 was spent on a new summit building.

For 1965-66, $175,000 was spent to develop the Province area, complete with a double chairlift. Named after the historic Province Road, the expansion provided an isolated area for novices.

Using matching Federal funds, the state spent a quarter of a million dollars to expand the Sno-Bowl for the 1967-68 season. Replacing the T-Bar was a longer double chairlift. Thanks to its elevation and exposure, the complex was used in early season operations, when the state budget allowed. Advertised as the Northeast Bowl, the area is known today as the Sun Bowl.

Struggles Without Snowmaking

In 1969-70, a 29% increase in lift ticket prices, coupled with poor weather, resulted in a significant drop in business.

While Cannon Mountain received state funds for snowmaking expansion, a double chairlift, and a new tramway in the 1970s, Sunapee retained its existing lift infrastructure and continued without snowmaking. In 1973, the state legislature allocated $14,000 for a snowmaking feasibility study at Cannon. Even after a mid-January opening day in 1974 and a Sno-Engineering conclusion that a snowmaking system would be worthwhile, New Hampshire's Department of Resources and Economic Development commissioner George Gilman deemed the project unnecessary. When talk of leasing Sunapee came up later that decade, thus allowing for a private entity to finance snowmaking, Gilman was also opposed.

The early 1980s were not kind to Sunapee, as the lack of snowmaking was magnified by bad winters. Sunapee was only open for 24 days in 1979-80 and only a few dozen more the following season. Even when there was natural snow, skiers were going elsewhere for more reliable conditions. As a result, the state purchased a $2.2 million snowmaking system for Sunapee in 1982.

For the 1984-1985 season, the State of New Hampshire spent $125,000 on a new maintenance building, pony lift, improved snowmaking equipment at Sunapee.

A Lift and a Lawsuit

Mt. Sunapee in the 1980s
Mt. Sunapee in the 1980s

In September of 1985, the State of New Hampshire awarded a $1,997,500 contract to Riblet for the construction/retrofitting of three triple chairlifts at Mt. Sunapee, despite opposition from Public Works, a ski lift engineer, and Governor Sununu. While the first lift was to be completed in December 1985, it was not ready until the following March, when the State cancelled the contract. A lawsuit resulted, which was not settled until 1993. Due to the fiasco, the North Peak and Summit triple chairlifts were not installed until 1987, when the State of New Hampshire Executive Council authorized a $1,550,000 contract with Doppelmayr. An additional $67,000 contract with Doppelmayr was authorized later that year for work on the Duckling chairlift.

In June of 1988, the State of New Hampshire Executive Council authorized a $148,000 increase in a contract with Sno-engineering for evaluation, upgrading, and expansion at Mt. Sunapee. Later that year, an $45,000 was approved for the study and design of a potential new lodge. The following year, snowboarding was allowed at Sunapee for the first time.

Private Investment and Management

Mt. Sunapee in the 1990s
Mt. Sunapee in the 1990s

After spending millions of dollars and sustaining many operational losses, the State of New Hampshire started to explore getting out of the ski business during the 1990s. In September of 1996, the State of New Hampshire Executive Council authorized a $14,850 agreement with Sno-Engineering for development of a potential lease for Cannon Mountain and Mt. Sunapee.

While initially leases for both state owned ski areas were put out to bid, the proposal was narrowed to just Sunapee in the spring of 1998. At this point, Governor Jeanne Shaheen endorsed the plan. Finalists for Mt. Sunapee included the Muellers, owners of Okemo, VT; the Crowleys, operators of Wachusett, MA, and CSK International, connected with Jay Peak, VT. As part of the agreement, initial lease revenues would be used to fund improvements at Cannon Mountain.

The Mueller family, best known for building Okemo into a major resort, was awarded a lease of the ski area in the summer of 1998. As soon as the ink was dry on the lease agreement, the Muellers began a $14 million improvement campaign over the next half decade. Improvements began immediately, as snowmaking was improved and two quad chairlifts were installed, including the area's first high speed detachable quad. Jay Gamble was hired as general manager.

For 1999, a new lodge was built adjacent to the base of the detachable quad. For the following season, the aging Province chairlift was replaced with a new fixed grip quad. The new lift, along with a magic carpet, revolutionized the beginner area. By 2000-2001, skier visits at Mt. Sunapee had more than doubled under the private ownership.

The area became part of the Muellers' Triple Peaks company circa 2002. To help disburse crowds and keep the area growing, expansions were planned into the East Bowl and West Bowl, the latter of which was on private land owned by the operators and would potentially involve real estate development. These plans came to a screeching halt when John Lynch was elected Governor in 2004. Despite supporting a publicly funded expansion onto Mittersill Peak at Cannon Mountain, Governor Lynch promised to stop any attempt to expand the area.

Snowmaking in 2013
Snowmaking in 2013

As the banking crisis unfolded, many ski areas across the country transferred their debt into Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs). On December 5, 2008, Triple Peaks transferred its privately held Mt. Sunapee assets to CNL Lifestyle Properties, Inc.. Triple Peaks then entered into a long agreement with CNL to maintain operational control.

Though Mt. Sunapee was unable to expand due to the political climate, it continued to improve its existing facilities, as well as its snowmaking and grooming. For the 2014-15 season, the Sun Bowl Quad was replaced with a high speed detachable quad (from Okemo).

On July 11, 2014, a judge decided in favor of Mt. Sunapee's operators to potentially clearly the way for the long proposed West Bowl project. Two years later, the State of New Hampshire approved the West Bowl expansion.

On June 4, 2018, the Muellers announced they were selling their ski area holdings to to Vail Resorts. After completing the purchase, Vail transferred Bruce Schmidt from Okemo to take over as general manager. One year later, Vail transferred Schmidt back to Okemo and transferred Tracy Bartels from Keystone to take over as general manager at Sunapee. Following the 2019-20 season, Bartels was transferred to Mt. Snow, with Peter Disch subsequently being transferred from Wilmot Mountain to take over as general manager at Sunapee.

NewEnglandSkiConditions.com Reports
Month Average Percent of Terrain Open
December30%    (12 reports)30 Open
January83%    (7 reports)83 Open
February88%    (5 reports)88 Open
March86%    (8 reports)86 Open
April61%    (9 reports)61 Open
Recent Conditions Reports
Apr. 11, 2021 by nhalex
Corn, Bare Spots
Apr. 9, 2021 by nhalex
Corn, Bare Spots
Apr. 2, 2021 by nhalex
Frozen Granular, Bare Spots
Mar. 21, 2021 by nhalex
Spring Snow, Frozen Granular
Jan. 18, 2021 by nhalex
Loose Granular, Frozen Granular
Mount Sunapee Resort on NewEnglandSkiConditions.com

NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News
Recent Articles
Sunapee Retires the Duckling Double - Jan. 3, 2019
Mount Sunapee West Bowl Expansion Re-Approved - Dec. 20, 2018
Musical Chairs at Vail and Pacific Owned New England Ski Areas - Nov. 26, 2018
Vail Acquisition of Sunapee Lease Approved - Sep. 26, 2018
Real Estate Development Fears Raised at Sunapee Hearing - Jul. 26, 2018
New Hampshire to Hold Sunapee Hearing in Late July - Jul. 7, 2018
Vail Resorts Purchases Okemo and Sunapee - Jun. 4, 2018
Initial Lift Construction Continues in Two States - May. 18, 2018
Cannon Mountain Posts Large Loss as Cumulative Deficits Exceed $9 Million - Oct. 31, 2016
Mount Sunapee West Bowl Expansion Approved - Apr. 6, 2016
Mount Sunapee Resort NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News Page

Expansion History
Project
Season
East Bowl
Cancelled
Sun Bowl
Open
1953-54
West Bowl
Proposed

Image Gallery
1952-53 Eastern Ski Map1953-54 Eastern Ski Map1954-55 Eastern Ski Map1955-56 Eastern Ski Map1956-57 Eastern Ski Map1957-58 Eastern Ski Map
View All Images in Mount Sunapee Resort Image Gallery

Lifts
Click on lift name for information and photos
Standing Lifts
Installed
The Clipper Ship Quad in 2003
Clipper Ship Quad
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
2000-01
The North Peak Triple in 2002
North Peak Triple
Doppelmayr
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1987-88
The Spruce Triple in 2002
Spruce Triple
Riblet-Doppelmayr
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1985-86
The top of the lift (October 2014)
Sun Bowl Express Quad
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
2014-15
The Sunapee Express Quad in 2002
Sunapee Express Quad
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
1998-99

Past Lifts
Seasons
The Duckling Double in 2002
Duckling Double
Roebling
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1962-63
-
2019-20
Elliott T-Bar
Roebling
T-Bar
1960-61
-
1984-85
The North Peak Double (bottom) and Summit Double (top) circa the 1960s
North Peak Double
Roebling
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1962-63
-
1986-87
The Single Chair circa the late 1940s
North Peak Single
Roebling
Chairlift - Single - Fixed
1948-49
-
1961-62
Pomalift
Poma
Platter
1957-58
-
1961-62
Province Double
Heron-Hopkins
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1965-66
-
1999-00
The Summit Double circa the 1960s
Summit Double
Roebling
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1962-63
-
1986-87
The top terminal (1960s)
Summit T-Bar
Constam
T-Bar
1953-54
-
1966-67
Summit Triple
Doppelmayr
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1987-88
-
1997-98
The Sun Bowl Double circa the mid to late 1960s
Sun Bowl Double
Heron-Hopkins
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1967-68
-
1997-98
The Sun Bowl Quad in 2002
Sun Bowl Quad
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1998-99
-
2013-14
Sunny Slopes J-Bar
Robbins
J-Bar
1962-63
-
1983-84

Maps
2020-21 Mt. Sunapee Trail Map
1962-63 Mt. Sunapee Trail Map1963-64 Mt. Sunapee Trail Map1964-65 Mt. Sunapee Trail Map1967-68 Mt. Sunapee Trail Map1968-69 Mt. Sunapee Trail Map1970s Mt. Sunapee Trail Map
View All Mount Sunapee Resort Trail Maps

Year by Year History
Adult Weekend Full Day Lift Ticket; Adult Full Price Unlimited Season Pass
2020s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2020-21$83.002020-21 Ticket Price Graph$639.002020-21 Season Pass Price Graph7.7 daysDecember 12April 112020-21 Skier Visit Graph
2019-20$99.002019-20 Ticket Price Graph$739.002019-20 Season Pass Price Graph7.5 daysNovember 27March 142019-20 Skier Visit Graph
2010s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2018-19$98.002018-19 Ticket Price Graph$709.002018-19 Season Pass Price Graph7.2 daysNovember 29April 72018-19 Skier Visit Graph
2017-18$93.002017-18 Ticket Price Graph$1375.002017-18 Season Pass Price Graph14.8 daysNovember 22April 13186,0002017-18 Skier Visit Graph
2016-17$84.002016-17 Ticket Price Graph$1269.002016-17 Season Pass Price Graph15.1 daysDecember 6April 9222,0002016-17 Skier Visit Graph
2015-16$82.002015-16 Ticket Price Graph$1249.002015-16 Season Pass Price Graph15.2 daysNovember 27March 27179,0002015-16 Skier Visit Graph
2014-15$79.002014-15 Ticket Price Graph$1199.002014-15 Season Pass Price Graph15.2 daysNovember 28April 19261,0002014-15 Skier Visit Graph
2013-14$76.002013-14 Ticket Price Graph$1149.002013-14 Season Pass Price Graph15.1 daysNovember 29April 13254,0002013-14 Skier Visit Graph
2012-13$74.002012-13 Ticket Price Graph$1119.002012-13 Season Pass Price Graph15.1 daysNovember 30April 14255,0002012-13 Skier Visit Graph
2011-12$72.002011-12 Ticket Price Graph$1089.002011-12 Season Pass Price Graph15.1 daysDecember 11March 22214,0002011-12 Skier Visit Graph
2010-11$70.002010-11 Ticket Price Graph2010-11 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 30April 10288,0002010-11 Skier Visit Graph
2009-10$68.002009-10 Ticket Price Graph2009-10 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 8April 8265,0002009-10 Skier Visit Graph
2000s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2008-09$66.002008-09 Ticket Price Graph$999.002008-09 Season Pass Price Graph15.1 daysNovember 28April 5273,0002008-09 Skier Visit Graph
2007-08$64.002007-08 Ticket Price Graph$969.002007-08 Season Pass Price Graph15.1 daysNovember 23April 20280,0002007-08 Skier Visit Graph
2006-07$62.002006-07 Ticket Price Graph$929.002006-07 Season Pass Price Graph15.0 daysDecember 6April 22230,0002006-07 Skier Visit Graph
2005-06$58.002005-06 Ticket Price Graph$899.002005-06 Season Pass Price Graph15.5 daysNovember 25April 3234,0002005-06 Skier Visit Graph
2004-05$56.002004-05 Ticket Price Graph$995.002004-05 Season Pass Price Graph17.8 daysDecember 5April 10257,0002004-05 Skier Visit Graph
2003-04$54.002003-04 Ticket Price Graph$965.002003-04 Season Pass Price Graph17.9 daysDecember 4April 11229,0002003-04 Skier Visit Graph
2002-03$51.002002-03 Ticket Price Graph$920.002002-03 Season Pass Price Graph18.0 daysNovember 29April 13272,0002002-03 Skier Visit Graph
2001-02$49.002001-02 Ticket Price Graph$890.002001-02 Season Pass Price Graph18.2 daysDecember 10April 7231,0002001-02 Skier Visit Graph
2000-01$47.002000-01 Ticket Price Graph$865.002000-01 Season Pass Price Graph18.4 daysNovember 23April 22258,0002000-01 Skier Visit Graph
1999-00$44.001999-00 Ticket Price Graph1999-00 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 19April 2189,0001999-00 Skier Visit Graph
1990s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1998-99$41.001998-99 Ticket Price Graph1998-99 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 11April 11165,0001998-99 Skier Visit Graph
1997-98$37.001997-98 Ticket Price Graph1997-98 Season Pass Price Graph109,1831997-98 Skier Visit Graph
1996-97$37.001996-97 Ticket Price Graph1996-97 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 30April 6107,4671996-97 Skier Visit Graph
1995-961995-96 Ticket Price Graph1995-96 Season Pass Price GraphApril 7119,8801995-96 Skier Visit Graph
1994-951994-95 Ticket Price Graph1994-95 Season Pass Price GraphMarch 2672,7191994-95 Skier Visit Graph
1993-94$34.001993-94 Ticket Price Graph1993-94 Season Pass Price GraphApril 2122,5001993-94 Skier Visit Graph
1992-93$32.001992-93 Ticket Price Graph1992-93 Season Pass Price Graph115,0001992-93 Skier Visit Graph
1991-92$31.001991-92 Ticket Price Graph1991-92 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 2995,0001991-92 Skier Visit Graph
1990-91$29.001990-91 Ticket Price Graph1990-91 Season Pass Price Graph1990-91 Skier Visit Graph
1989-90$27.001989-90 Ticket Price Graph1989-90 Season Pass Price Graph120,0001989-90 Skier Visit Graph
1980s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1988-89$24.001988-89 Ticket Price Graph1988-89 Season Pass Price GraphMarch 2656,0001988-89 Skier Visit Graph
1987-88$22.001987-88 Ticket Price Graph1987-88 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 191987-88 Skier Visit Graph
1986-87$20.001986-87 Ticket Price Graph1986-87 Season Pass Price Graph1986-87 Skier Visit Graph
1985-86$18.001985-86 Ticket Price Graph1985-86 Season Pass Price Graph1985-86 Skier Visit Graph
1983-84$18.001983-84 Ticket Price Graph1983-84 Season Pass Price Graph1983-84 Skier Visit Graph
1982-83$16.001982-83 Ticket Price Graph1982-83 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 241982-83 Skier Visit Graph
1981-821981-82 Ticket Price Graph1981-82 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 181981-82 Skier Visit Graph
1980-81$12.001980-81 Ticket Price Graph1980-81 Season Pass Price Graph1980-81 Skier Visit Graph
1979-80$11.001979-80 Ticket Price Graph1979-80 Season Pass Price GraphFebruary 171979-80 Skier Visit Graph
1970s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1978-79$11.001978-79 Ticket Price Graph1978-79 Season Pass Price Graph1978-79 Skier Visit Graph
1977-78$11.001977-78 Ticket Price Graph$300.001977-78 Season Pass Price Graph27.3 days1977-78 Skier Visit Graph
1976-77$10.001976-77 Ticket Price Graph$240.001976-77 Season Pass Price Graph24.0 days1976-77 Skier Visit Graph
1975-76$10.001975-76 Ticket Price Graph1975-76 Season Pass Price Graph1975-76 Skier Visit Graph
1974-75$9.001974-75 Ticket Price Graph1974-75 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 181974-75 Skier Visit Graph
1973-74$9.001973-74 Ticket Price Graph1973-74 Season Pass Price GraphJanuary 101973-74 Skier Visit Graph
1972-73$9.001972-73 Ticket Price Graph1972-73 Season Pass Price Graph1972-73 Skier Visit Graph
1971-72$9.001971-72 Ticket Price Graph1971-72 Season Pass Price Graph1971-72 Skier Visit Graph
1970-71$9.001970-71 Ticket Price Graph1970-71 Season Pass Price Graph1970-71 Skier Visit Graph
1969-70$9.001969-70 Ticket Price Graph1969-70 Season Pass Price Graph1969-70 Skier Visit Graph
1960s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1968-69$7.001968-69 Ticket Price Graph$115.001968-69 Season Pass Price Graph16.4 days1968-69 Skier Visit Graph
1967-68$7.001967-68 Ticket Price Graph1967-68 Season Pass Price Graph1967-68 Skier Visit Graph
1966-67$7.001966-67 Ticket Price Graph$115.001966-67 Season Pass Price Graph16.4 daysDecember 161966-67 Skier Visit Graph
1965-661965-66 Ticket Price Graph$100.001965-66 Season Pass Price Graph1965-66 Skier Visit Graph
1964-65$6.001964-65 Ticket Price Graph1964-65 Season Pass Price Graph1964-65 Skier Visit Graph
1963-64$6.001963-64 Ticket Price Graph1963-64 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 26124,0001963-64 Skier Visit Graph
1962-63$6.001962-63 Ticket Price Graph$100.001962-63 Season Pass Price Graph16.7 daysDecember 24124,0001962-63 Skier Visit Graph
1961-62$5.001961-62 Ticket Price Graph$65.001961-62 Season Pass Price Graph13.0 daysDecember 21April 8100,8501961-62 Skier Visit Graph
1960-611960-61 Ticket Price Graph1960-61 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 16April 2116,5741960-61 Skier Visit Graph
1959-60$4.501959-60 Ticket Price Graph1959-60 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 28April 1797,4781959-60 Skier Visit Graph
1950s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1958-59$4.501958-59 Ticket Price Graph1958-59 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 131958-59 Skier Visit Graph
1957-581957-58 Ticket Price Graph1957-58 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 7April 221957-58 Skier Visit Graph
1956-571956-57 Ticket Price Graph1956-57 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 221956-57 Skier Visit Graph
1955-561955-56 Ticket Price Graph1955-56 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 10April 221955-56 Skier Visit Graph
1954-551954-55 Ticket Price Graph1954-55 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 4April 61954-55 Skier Visit Graph
1953-541953-54 Ticket Price Graph1953-54 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 171953-54 Skier Visit Graph
1952-531952-53 Ticket Price Graph1952-53 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 141952-53 Skier Visit Graph
1951-521951-52 Ticket Price Graph1951-52 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 16April 131951-52 Skier Visit Graph
1949-501949-50 Ticket Price Graph1949-50 Season Pass Price GraphJanuary 221949-50 Skier Visit Graph
1940s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1948-491948-49 Ticket Price Graph1948-49 Season Pass Price GraphJanuary 22March 271948-49 Skier Visit Graph

Visitor Memories
Add a memory of Mount Sunapee Resort
First Name:
Last Name:
E-Mail Address:
Comments:



External Links
  • Mount Sunapee - official site
  • Sunapee Mountain - FranklinSites.com Hiking Guide
  • Jonni's Mount Sunapee Ski Guide
  • Mount Sunapee - TaxpayersforCannon.com
  • Last updated: June 3, 2021

    Also on NewEnglandSkiHistory.com...
    Big expansion plans at Waterville?
    Big expansion plans at Waterville?
    A grand hotel in northern New Hampshire
    A grand hotel in northern New Hampshire
    Once a large ski area, now defunct
    Once a large ski area, now defunct
    Once one of the busiest areas in New England...now idle
    Once one of the busiest areas in New England...now idle
    Berkshire Snow Basin, Swift River, and the Ninja Turtles
    Berkshire Snow Basin, Swift River, and the Ninja Turtles
    West Bowl at Jay Peak?
    West Bowl at Jay Peak?
       CCC Trails    Cancelled Ski Areas    Expansions    Lifts    Management    Maps    News    Then and Now    Timelines    Topics    In The Press    Links    Site Map    What's New    Feedback

    Copyright 2002-2019, All Rights Reserved.