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SkiNewEngland.net
 
The K1 Gondola (2005)
Killington
Killington, Vermont
Status: Open
First Season:1958-59
Vertical Drop:3050 feet
Standing Lifts:2 gondolas, 1 six pack, 5 high speed quads, 4 quads, 3 triples, 1 double, surface lifts
Past Lifts:1 gondola, 3 quads, 2 triples, 9 doubles, surface lifts
Left: The K1 Gondola (2005)
Recent NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News:
6/4/2022: 2021-22 Season Comes to an End
3/30/2022: Killington Base Lodge Demolition Underway
12/30/2021: COVID-19 Outbreak Affects Killington Employees
11/3/2021: Killington to Open Friday
SkiNewEngland.net Profile
At 4,235 feet in elevation, Killington Peak is second highest peak in Vermont, as well as one of the highest in all of New England. Killington Peak is best known as being home to Killington Resort, which is by many measurements the biggest ski area in the Northeast.

Killington Peak
An early photo of Killington Peak
An early photo of Killington Peak

Thanks to its commanding appearance and proximity to Rutland, Killington Peak was a recreational destination dating back to colonial American history. In July 1879, a carriage road was constructed up the western face of the mountain, leading to the opening of a near-summit hotel by M. Meyerhoffer in 1880. Initially quite popular, the building was expanded in 1882. According to Killington: A Story of Mountains and Men, an electric railway up the mountain was proposed later that decade. The hotel and summit parcel were sold to Marcellus Wheeler in 1901. By the time 1907 rolled around, reservation requests to stay at the hotel were denied, with the owner claiming they could not find an operator. The hotel and carriage road quickly deteriorated.

The earliest known ascent of Killington Peak on skis occurred in February 1917, when a group of Green Mountain Club members ascended the mountain on a particularly cold day. One of the two skiers in the group was Charles P. Cooper, who led additional winter ascents of Killington while serving as president of the Green Mountain Club. By this point, the hotel was no longer standing.

Future Governor Mortimer Proctor purchased the Killington summit tract from Wheeler in 1919. In 1927, the ridge that Killington Peak topped was named the Coolidge Range in honor of President Calvin Coolidge, who grew up in nearby Plymouth. Coolidge was quoted as saying, "Vermont is a state I love. I could not look upon the peaks of Ascutney, Killington, Mansfield, and Equinox without being moved in a way that no other scene can move me."

In the mid-1930s, Killington was chosen by the National Park Service as part of the route for the proposed Green Mountain Parkway. The bold proposal did not come to fruition.

For the winter of 1935-36, a ski development was constructed in the vicinity of nearby Shrewsbury Peak, including a rope tow and multiple trails.

Following the death of Charles P. Cooper in 1936, the Green Mountain Club proposed the construction of a lodge in his honor. Mortimer Proctor deeded a parcel of land to the state for the building, which was to be constructed near the site of the former hotel. Construction stretched over multiple years, as many roads were washed out by the September 1938 hurricane. State and Civilian Conservation Corps labor were also used in the construction, which was led to completion by state forester Perry Merrill. The Cooper Lodge was dedicated on Sunday, June 2, 1940.

Meanwhile, a lift-served ski development debuted on Little Pico for the 1937-38 season, adding a major T-Bar lift in 1940.

Circa 1941, the Vermont Forest and Parks Department reportedly put together plans for a ski area on Killington Peak. One of the earliest known public proposals to develop a lift served ski area on Killington occurred in 1944, when sketches of a ski area on the east side of the mountain were presented to local chambers of commerce. Talk was still circulating in late 1946, however two major impediments were a lack of an access road into the basin and concerns about hurting Pico's business. Circa late 1945, the State of Vermont reportedly acquired the Killington tract of land.

Preston Leete Smith and the Sherburne Corporation
1956 Killington Proposal
1956 Killington Proposal

The ski industry to continued to pass Killington by as a young Preston Leete Smith graduated from the Oakwood Friends School in 1948 and Earlham College in 1952. In the fall of 1954, Smith reportedly met with Perry Merrill and discussed purchasing Ascutney. Merrill persuaded Smith to instead look into developing a ski area on Killington Peak. Smith and Susanne Hahn were married in 1955 and began spending more time at his parents' home in Rockingham, Vermont, soon moving in with his grandparents. Smith spent considerable time on the mountain during the winter of 1955-56 inspecting terrain and snow depths.

Smith looked to build a ski area larger than Stowe on Killington Peak. According to Killington: A Story of Mountains and Men, around this time he met Joe Sargent, an investor in Mount Snow, who talked Smith down from initial plans of a cabin lift and three mountain peaks to a smaller upstart that could be more easily financed. The Sherburne Corporation was formed in April 1956. In early May, reports emerged that construction would soon begin and that the area could be in operation for the winter of 1956-57 with a lift, two trails, and temporary buildings. Smith estimated that some 150 acres of gladed terrain were already skiable.

The Sherburne Corporation held an event for potential out-of-state shareholders in late May 1956, when natural snow was still reported to be hanging on in places on the mountain. An agent from the Pomalift company showcased his company's lift technology, while the Sherburne Corp. discussed on-going work on the construction of an access road.

Smith's lift plans emerged in the summer of 1956, calling for a chairlift to the summit, an upper mountain Pomalift, and top-to-bottom Pomalifts on Snowdon and Skye Peak. The project made the Associated Press wire in July, as an off-beat news story involving porcupines caught the attention of readers. Crews working on the mountain reported that porcupines had been chewing on tires, rubber ignition wires, and even an aluminum skillet.

The project was dealt a blow in late 1956, when the State Highway Board announced there were no funds to construct the estimated $300,000 to $400,000 5-mile access road to the proposed ski area. The board suggested the issue would have to go to the legislature.

In April 1957, the state legislature appropriated $750,000 to construct access roads for Killington, Okemo, Burke, and Jay Peak. Two months later, the legislature approved $30,000 to construct a base lodge at Killington. The Sherburne Corporation proceeded with construction of the ski area, employing a crew of 15 to 17 men. Though the highway department completed a survey, it announced later in the summer that it would not construct the Killington access road in 1957 and that the estimated cost of the project had ballooned from $140,000 to $310,000.

In mid-November 1957, the Sherburne Corporation finally reached terms for a lease with the state. Terms for the initial 10-year lease included the state receiving 10% of annual revenue above $40,000. Despite being unable to open due to the access road situation, the Sherburne Corporation took delivery of the lower Snowdon Pomalift.

Killington Basin Opens

Killington Peak circa 1960
Killington Peak circa 1960

In April 1958, Preston Smith formally announced that Killington would open for the 1958-59 season. The state finally started constructing the 4.4 mile access road on May 5 while Sherburne Corporation crews worked on clearing trails and lift lines on Snowdon.

In August, the Sherburne Corporation took delivery of the upper Snowdon Poma as it began pouring tower footings for the lifts. As September arrived, the state began constructing the access road surface, using soil cement, asphalt, and blacktop layers. According to Killington: A Story of Mountains and Men, at this time the Sherburne Corporation had 94 shareholders, most of them residing in Vermont.

Construction continued to gain momentum as the fall arrived. In addition to trail and lift construction, the 6,000 square foot state base lodge was being built. With a work road now extending to the top of the mountain, Smith announced a third Pomalift would be constructed for the 1958-59 season, serving the Glade area. A forth Pomalift would serve a novice slope.

Amidst prime leaf peeping season, a dusting of snow covered the summit of Killington on October 12, 1958, foreshadowing ski season. The Rutland Herald declared it "more than a prophecy - it signaled the beginning of a multi-million dollar winter business which, here in Vermont, will provide countless hours of healthful pleasure to equally countless numbers of skiers." Paving of the access road was completed at the end of October.

The state advertised for a lodge operator in October and received only one bid: the Sherburne Corporation.

In early December, the Sherburne Corporation announced opening day would be December 13 and that up to seven miles of trails would be available, served by four lifts. Future plans of four more Pomalifts and two chairlifts were announced, with an expansion to Skye Peak expected for the 1959-60 season. Governor-elect Robert Strafford cut the ribbon for the formal opening, which featured the two Pomalifts on Snowdon and base depths of 20 to 36 inches. According to Killington: A Story of Mountains and Men, Killington recorded $25.50 in opening day ticket revenue.

The Killington Chairlift (1960s)
The Killington Chairlift (1960s)

The ski area continued its ascent into the "big leagues" in 1960, when it expanded to Killington Peak proper with the installation of the 6,300 foot Killington double chairlift and three new trails. In just its second season of operation, Killington turned a profit.

Paul Bousquet, son of Bousquet founder Clarence Bousquet, was named operations manager in January 1961. Bousquet was soon promoted to assistant treasurer and eventually general manager.

Beginner options were improved in the following years, as the first Snowshed chairlift was installed for the 1961-62 season, while sights were set on "North Peak." After a name change, the new peak debuted for the 1962-63 season as Ram's Head, providing more novice terrain.

The new Rams Head lodge circa the 1960s
The new Rams Head lodge circa the 1960s

Looking for a hedge against lean years while also extending the ski season, Killington invested in a Larchmont snowmaking system for the 1963-64 season. The initial attempts at snowmaking were unsuccessful, as the aluminum pipe installed in the Snowshed area exploded under pressure. Nevertheless, Killington continued to improve the system.

In 1964, Killington nearly exercised an option to purchase nearby Pico Peak.

Killington circa the 1960s
Killington circa the 1960s

Over the next few years, additional chairlifts were added to existing pods as more and more skiers continued to flock to the resort. In addition, the Killington base lodge was doubled in size for the winter of 1965-66. Revenues reportedly reached $1.5 million that season, which spanned from mid November to mid May for a total of 183 operating days. During the final weeks of the season, skiers carried their skis on the lift to reach the upper mountain snow and had to walk between patches of snow. The season reportedly continued as long as a half dozen skiers would show up, with Paul Bousquet stating, "we'll run until the skiers stop coming."

Killington continued focusing on season length in 1966, putting 400 tons of hay, 2.5 tons of hay seed, and 300 tons of fertilizer down to smooth the slopes. Early snowmaking allowed for October race training and the earliest opening to date (November 5).

As a profitable and growing business, Killington invested in numerous initiatives, such as a news bureau, weekly accounting closes, and analysis of competitors via airplane. All the while, a huge development was in the works for the latter part of the decade.

Onward to Route 4

The Killington Gondola circa 1970
The Killington Gondola circa 1970

A multi-year project due to delays in constructing the longest gondola in the world, Killington East opened with lift service during the 1969-70 season. While cost overruns put Sherburne Corporation in financial jeopardy at the time, the project increased the vertical drop by 50% to over 3,000 feet, firmly cementing Killington as the largest ski area in New England.

While Killington's early snowmaking focus had been on the Snowshed area, Pres Smith rolled the dice and installed higher elevation snowmaking on Snowdon for the 1971-72 season. Meanwhile, the first iteration of the Superstar trail debuted. Snowmaking was extended to the summit for the 1972-73 season, paired with the installation of the Glades Triple, the second ever installed in Vermont. Coining a new slogan of "King of Spring," Killington announced plans to offer lift served skiing in June. Though this would not occur for another 10 years, it nevertheless cemented Killington's reputation for offering New England's longest ski season.

Killington continued to expand around the Killington East development later in the 1970s with the addition of the South Ridge and Bear Mountain complexes. Also during the 1970s, the ownership purchased Sunday River and Mt. Snow.

Lift served June skiing was finally achieved 1982, when Killington operated until June 15. For the next two decades, a June closing became the norm.

Pres Smith in front of the new Northeast Passage Lodge (1980s)
Pres Smith in front of the new Northeast Passage Lodge (1980s)

Meanwhile, sights were set on Parker's Gore in the early 1980s as Sunrise opened, connecting the Bear Mountain area with US 4 via a 9,243 foot long triple chairlift. Hitting its stride as the middle of the decade neared, Killington was in continuous operation from October 20, 1983 until June 21, 1984, marking 246 consecutive days of skiing.

That fall, S-K-I Ltd. was formed, initially composed of Mt. Snow and Killington. While at the time it seemed liked Killington was on the verge of more big things, that fall also marked the narrow election of Madeleine Kunin as Governor of Vermont. With Burlington Mayor Bernie Sanders set to run against her in 2 years, Kunin quickly found her way onto the pages of the New York Times by going after big ski development, and specifically Killington. At one point, the Governor criticized Killington's water quality record, despite the fact the area had passed all of its state inspections.

Skiing off the summit (1983)
Skiing off the summit (1983)

As a result of the new road blocks, Killington made no capital investments for the 1985-86 season, ending a decades-long campaign of constant improvements. As Pres Smith told Ski magazine in 1985, "It's a disgrace for Vermont to have government officials say something that isn't even remotely true." Realizing that any significant expansion at Killington was now in jeopardy, S-K-I started to focus on expansion by acquisition. Carinthia was purchased in 1986, followed by what would become Bear Mountain, California in 1988. Three more areas were acquired in the first half of the 1990s.

The Killington Gondola circa the 1980s
The Killington Gondola circa the 1980s

Meanwhile, S-K-I continued to stay on the cutting edge of ski technology with its snowmaking, information systems, and lift infrastructure. Killington installed its first two high speed detachable quad chairlifts for the 1987-88 season, followed by its first modern gondola, the Skyeship, in 1994-95.

S-K-I Grows

During this time, S-K-I was involved in an arms race of sorts with former Killington employee Les Otten's LBO Resort Enterprises Corp.. While LBO was quickly acquiring areas, S-K-I purchased ownership stakes in Haystack, Sugarloaf, and Waterville. The two companies eventually agreed to a merger/buyout in 1996, creating the American Skiing Company

The American Skiing Company wasted no time in making a splash, as it installed three new quad chairlifts during its first year of ownership. Nearby Pico Peak was purchased in 1997, though plans to connect the two have never been completed. Meanwhile, Killington ceded its Parkers Gore holdings in exchange for base area land, the Pico interconnect, and snowmaking water from the Woodward Reservoir.

The Pico side of the Interconnect (2016)
The Pico side of the Interconnect (2016)

American Skiing Company's Last Run

The American Skiing Company's last new lift investment came in 1997-98, when it replaced the Killington chairlift with the K1 Gondola and retrofitted the Superstar Quad with Poma components. While there was one last victory with the completion of the Woodward Reservoir snowmaking project in 2000, American Skiing Company was drowning in debt, leaving a sea of deferred maintenance behind.

In 2007, Killington was purchased by SP Land Co., with Powdr Corp. taking over operations. The transition was not a smooth one, as controversy was stirred up due to the termination of lifetime passes, as well as the first April closing in over thirty years. Nonetheless, the area saw its first new chairlift in a decade when the Skye Peak Express was installed for the 2008-09 season.

Season length was later addressed when the new Peak Walkway was constructed for the 2010-11 season, providing fall skiers with a foot route between the top of the K1 Gondola and the top of the Canyon Quad and North Ridge Triple. Following the 2010-11 season, Killington announced the replacement of the Peak Lodge. The $7 million project started that off season, as the old lodge was demolished.

On August 28, 2011, Vermont suffered significant damage from Hurricane Irene. In addition to severe road washouts in the area, Killington lost a bar in the base area. Work on the summit lodge was slowed while repairs started elsewhere, including the construction of an umbrella bar to replace the lost building.

Return of the King of Spring

The Superstar Glacier (February 2016)
The Superstar Glacier (February 2016)

After a seven year break, Killington returned to its late season dominance in 2012-13, when it stayed open through May 26. The Robert Carl Williams Associates designed Peak Lodge for the following season.

An expansion of off season activities ramped up starting in 2014 with the debut of lift served mountain biking via the Snowshed Quad. Further attractions were constructed in 2015, including a ropes course, a Soaring Eagle ride, and a mountain coaster.

Killington faced a big challenge in 2016 as it worked to host the first World Cup racing in New England in a quarter of a century. While western ski areas were forced to cancel their World Cup races in November, Killington flexed its snowmaking might by covering the Superstar slope top to bottom in less than optimal temperatures. New England native Mikaela Shiffrin won the Slalom event in 2016 and repeated the feat in 2017 and 2018.

The Snowdon Six Express and lower snow tunnel (December 2018)
The Snowdon Six Express and lower snow tunnel (December 2018)

Citing advantages from tax reform, Killington embarked on a $25 million capital improvement campaign in 2018, including a new high speed six person bubble chairlift, two relocated lifts, K1 gondola improvements, snowbridges, RFID, and snowmaking improvements. Despite delays from abundant early season snowfall, the Snowdon Six Express debuted in early December. The South Ridge Quad debuted in February, restoring direct lift service to that trail complex for the first time in nearly a decade.

The rejuvenated South Ridge complex (March 2019)
The rejuvenated South Ridge complex (March 2019)

The big investments continued during the 2019 off season, as the aging early season workhorse North Ridge Triple was replaced with a new fixed grip quad. In addition, work began on a proposed two-year, $27 million replacement of the K1 base lodge. Though Killington was in the midst of a resurgence, COVID-19 brought things to a screeching halt. Not only did Killington have its earliest closing date on record on March 14, but lodge construction was delayed and the 2020 World Cup races cancelled. Ski operations resumed over eight months later, making 2020 the longest off-season of the snowmaking era.

NewEnglandSkiConditions.com Reports
Month Average Percent of Terrain Open
October1%    (1 report)1 Open
November9%    (6 reports)9 Open
December50%    (6 reports)50 Open
January76%    (6 reports)76 Open
February88%    (8 reports)88 Open
March79%    (7 reports)79 Open
April37%    (13 reports)37 Open
May4%    (18 reports)4 Open
June1%    (3 reports)1 Open
Recent Conditions Reports
May. 1, 2022 by indyskier29
Spring Snow, Corn
Apr. 30, 2022 by rhodeislandskier
Spring Snow, Variable Conditions
Apr. 30, 2022 by alpinevillagepres
Corn, Spring Snow
Apr. 22, 2022 by nordicgal
Variable Conditions, Spring Snow
Apr. 6, 2022 by nordicgal
Spring Snow, Variable Conditions
Killington on NewEnglandSkiConditions.com

NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News
Recent Articles
2021-22 Season Comes to an End - Jun. 4, 2022
Killington Base Lodge Demolition Underway - Mar. 30, 2022
COVID-19 Outbreak Affects Killington Employees - Dec. 30, 2021
Killington to Open Friday - Nov. 3, 2021
Sugarbush Sets New England Record with $170 Lift Ticket - Oct. 16, 2021
Base Facility Projects Continue as Season Approaches - Oct. 11, 2021
2020-21 Season Comes to an End - May. 20, 2021
Killington Postpones Base Lodge Construction - Jan. 7, 2021
Killington Pushes Back Opening Day - Sep. 10, 2020
Killington World Cup Races Cancelled - Aug. 20, 2020
Killington NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News Page

Expansion History
Project
Season
Parker's Gore
Cancelled
1980s
Killington Peak
Open
1959-60
Ram's Head
Open
1962-63
Killington East
Open
1968-69
South Ridge
Open
1977-78
Bear Mountain
Open
1979-80
Sunrise
Open
1982-83
Killington-Pico Interconnect
Proposed

Image Gallery
1959-60 Eastern Ski Map1960-61 Eastern Ski Map1961-62 Eastern Ski Map1962-63 Eastern Ski Map1964-65 Eastern Ski Map1970-71 Eastern Ski Map
View All Images in Killington Image Gallery
Lifts
Click on lift name for information and photos
Standing Lifts
Installed
The Bear Mountain Quad in 2002
Bear Mountain Quad
Yan
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1984-85
The Canyon Quad in 2014
Canyon Quad
Yan-Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1992-93
The K1 Gondola (April 2002)
K1 Gondola
Poma
Gondola - 8 Person
1997-98
The top terminal (2016)
Needle's Eye Express Quad
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
1996-97
The lift line (November 2019)
North Ridge Quad
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
2019-20
The bottom terminal (2016)
Northbrook Quad
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1996-97
The bottom terminal (2016)
Ram's Head Express Quad
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
1996-97
The Skye Peak Express Quad in 2010
Skye Peak Express Quad
Leitner-Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
2008-09
The mid station (2016)
Skyeship Gondola
Poma
Gondola - 8 Person
1994-95
The top terminal (December 2018)
Snowdon Six Express
Poma
Chairlift - Sixpack - Detachable
2018-19
The base terminal (2016)
Snowdon Triple
Heron-Poma
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1973-74
The bottom terminal (2015)
Snowshed Double #1
Yan-Poma
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1987-88
The bottom terminal (2015)
Snowshed Express Quad
Yan-Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
1987-88
The lift line (March 2019)
South Ridge Quad
Poma-Yan
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
2018-19
The lower Northeast Passage lift line (January 1988)
Sunrise Village Triple
Yan
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1982-83
The Superstar Express Quad in 2002
Superstar Express Quad
Yan-Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
1987-88
The base terminal (December 2018)
Swirl Poma
Poma
Platter
2018-19

Past Lifts
Seasons
The Bear Mountain Triple circa 1980
Bear Mountain Triple
Yan
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1979-80
-
1983-84
The Devil's Fiddle Quad in early 1984
Devil's Fiddle Quad
Yan
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1983-84
-
2007-08
The Glades Poma circa the 1960s
Glades Poma
Poma
Platter
1958-59
-
1971-72
The Killington Chairlift circa the 1960s
Killington Chairlift
Carlevaro & Savio
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1959-60
-
1974-75
The Killington Gondola circa the 1980s
Killington Gondola
Carlevaro & Savio
Gondola - 4 Person
1969-70
-
1993-94
The top terminal circa the mid 1980s
Killington Peak Double
Hall
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1975-76
-
1996-97
Installation of towers (September 1958)
Lower Snowdon Poma
Poma
Platter
1958-59
-
The lift line (background left) (January 1983)
Needles Eye Double
Yan
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1976-77
-
1995-96
The North Ridge Triple in 2014
North Ridge Triple
Heron-Poma
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1972-73
-
2018-19
The lift line circa the 1960s
Novice Poma
Poma
Platter
1958-59
-
Novice Poma
Poma
Platter
1961-62
-
1962-63
The lift line circa the 1970s
Ram's Head Double
Poma
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1962-63
-
1995-96
Ski School Poma
Poma
Platter
1982-83
-
2007-08
The lift line (January 1988)
Skye Peak Quad
Yan
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1984-85
-
2007-08
Snowdon Double
Hall
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1964-65
-
1991-92
The Snowdon Quad in 2006
Snowdon Quad
Yan-Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1992-93
-
2017-18
The Snowshed Doubles circa the mid 1960s
Snowshed Double #1
Poma
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1961-62
-
1986-87
The Snowshed Double 2 (right) circa the 1980s
Snowshed Double #2
Poma
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1963-64
-
1986-87
The bottom terminal (2015)
Snowshed Double #2
Yan-Poma
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1987-88
-
2015-16
The Snowshed Double 3 (left) circa the 1980s
Snowshed Double #3
Poma
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1966-67
-
1986-87
The Snowshed Poma (right) circa the 1960s
Snowshed Poma

Platter
1963-64
-
The top terminal circa 1980
South Ridge Triple
Yan
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1977-78
-
2010-11
The lift line (2016)
Upper Snowdon Poma
Poma
Platter
1958-59
-
2017-18

Maps
2021-22 Killington Trail Map
1962-63 Killington Trail Map1963-64 Killington Trail Map1964-65 Killington Trail MapKillington circa 1965-66 trail map1968-69 Killington Trail Map1969-70 Killington Trail Map
View All Killington Trail Maps

Year by Year History
Adult Weekend Full Day Lift Ticket; Adult Full Price Unlimited Season Pass
2020s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2021-22$184.142021-22 Ticket Price Graph$1567.742021-22 Season Pass Price Graph8.5 daysNovember 5June 42021-22 Skier Visit Graph
2020-21$170.002020-21 Ticket Price Graph$1582.532020-21 Season Pass Price Graph9.3 daysNovember 20May 162020-21 Skier Visit Graph
2019-20$130.002019-20 Ticket Price Graph$1336.432019-20 Season Pass Price Graph10.3 daysNovember 3March 142019-20 Skier Visit Graph
2010s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2018-19$129.002018-19 Ticket Price Graph$1292.142018-19 Season Pass Price Graph10.0 daysOctober 19June 22018-19 Skier Visit Graph
2017-18$115.002017-18 Ticket Price Graph$1261.532017-18 Season Pass Price Graph11.0 daysNovember 8May 262017-18 Skier Visit Graph
2016-17$105.002016-17 Ticket Price Graph$1486.232016-17 Season Pass Price Graph14.2 daysOctober 25June 12016-17 Skier Visit Graph
2015-16$96.002015-16 Ticket Price Graph$1464.832015-16 Season Pass Price Graph15.3 daysOctober 18May 292015-16 Skier Visit Graph
2014-15$92.002014-15 Ticket Price Graph$1443.432014-15 Season Pass Price Graph15.7 daysNovember 3May 252014-15 Skier Visit Graph
2013-14$89.002013-14 Ticket Price Graph$1389.932013-14 Season Pass Price Graph15.6 daysOctober 23May 182013-14 Skier Visit Graph
2012-13$88.002012-13 Ticket Price Graph$1443.432012-13 Season Pass Price Graph16.4 daysOctober 13May 262012-13 Skier Visit Graph
2011-12$86.002011-12 Ticket Price Graph$1443.432011-12 Season Pass Price Graph16.8 daysOctober 29April 222011-12 Skier Visit Graph
2010-11$84.002010-11 Ticket Price Graph$1389.932010-11 Season Pass Price Graph16.5 daysNovember 2May 12010-11 Skier Visit Graph
2009-10$82.002009-10 Ticket Price Graph$1336.432009-10 Season Pass Price Graph16.3 daysNovember 7April 252009-10 Skier Visit Graph
2000s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2008-09$82.002008-09 Ticket Price Graph$1443.432008-09 Season Pass Price Graph17.6 daysNovember 2May 22008-09 Skier Visit Graph
2007-08$79.002007-08 Ticket Price Graph$1376.942007-08 Season Pass Price Graph17.4 daysNovember 16April 202007-08 Skier Visit Graph
2006-07$72.002006-07 Ticket Price Graph$1400.002006-07 Season Pass Price Graph19.4 daysNovember 23May 6700,0002006-07 Skier Visit Graph
2005-06$69.002005-06 Ticket Price Graph$1300.002005-06 Season Pass Price Graph18.8 daysOctober 29May 1795,0002005-06 Skier Visit Graph
2004-052004-05 Ticket Price Graph$1100.002004-05 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 9May 15986,0002004-05 Skier Visit Graph
2003-04$67.002003-04 Ticket Price Graph2003-04 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 10May 12955,0002003-04 Skier Visit Graph
2002-03$64.002002-03 Ticket Price Graph2002-03 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 25May 261,045,0002002-03 Skier Visit Graph
2001-02$62.002001-02 Ticket Price Graph$1099.002001-02 Season Pass Price Graph17.7 daysNovember 6June 1953,0002001-02 Skier Visit Graph
2000-01$58.002000-01 Ticket Price Graph$1249.002000-01 Season Pass Price Graph21.5 daysOctober 29May 271,085,0002000-01 Skier Visit Graph
1999-00$56.001999-00 Ticket Price Graph$1249.001999-00 Season Pass Price Graph22.3 daysOctober 25May 29939,0001999-00 Skier Visit Graph
1990s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1998-99$52.001998-99 Ticket Price Graph$1299.001998-99 Season Pass Price Graph25.0 daysOctober 22May 25978,0001998-99 Skier Visit Graph
1997-98$49.001997-98 Ticket Price Graph$1249.001997-98 Season Pass Price Graph25.5 daysOctober 1May 251,077,0001997-98 Skier Visit Graph
1996-971996-97 Ticket Price Graph$1500.001996-97 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 4June 221996-97 Skier Visit Graph
1995-961995-96 Ticket Price Graph1995-96 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 17June 101995-96 Skier Visit Graph
1994-95$46.001994-95 Ticket Price Graph1994-95 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 3June 41994-95 Skier Visit Graph
1993-94$45.001993-94 Ticket Price Graph1993-94 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 1June 91993-94 Skier Visit Graph
1992-931992-93 Ticket Price Graph1992-93 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 1June 1972,0001992-93 Skier Visit Graph
1991-92$39.001991-92 Ticket Price Graph1991-92 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 21June 141991-92 Skier Visit Graph
1990-91$39.001990-91 Ticket Price Graph1990-91 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 27May 281990-91 Skier Visit Graph
1989-90$37.001989-90 Ticket Price Graph1989-90 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 10May 281989-90 Skier Visit Graph
1980s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1988-89$34.001988-89 Ticket Price Graph1988-89 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 13May 211988-89 Skier Visit Graph
1987-88$35.001987-88 Ticket Price Graph1987-88 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 12June 11987-88 Skier Visit Graph
1986-87$30.001986-87 Ticket Price Graph1986-87 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 10June 31986-87 Skier Visit Graph
1985-861985-86 Ticket Price Graph1985-86 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 28June 11985-86 Skier Visit Graph
1984-85$26.001984-85 Ticket Price Graph$580.001984-85 Season Pass Price Graph22.3 daysNovember 3June 21984-85 Skier Visit Graph
1983-84$25.001983-84 Ticket Price Graph$550.001983-84 Season Pass Price Graph22.0 daysOctober 20June 211983-84 Skier Visit Graph
1982-83$24.001982-83 Ticket Price Graph$525.001982-83 Season Pass Price Graph21.9 daysOctober 17June 161982-83 Skier Visit Graph
1981-82$22.001981-82 Ticket Price Graph1981-82 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 20June 151981-82 Skier Visit Graph
1980-81$20.001980-81 Ticket Price Graph1980-81 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 14May 271980-81 Skier Visit Graph
1979-80$17.001979-80 Ticket Price Graph$397.001979-80 Season Pass Price Graph23.4 daysOctober 10May 231979-80 Skier Visit Graph
1970s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1978-79$15.001978-79 Ticket Price Graph1978-79 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 16May 22676,0561978-79 Skier Visit Graph
1977-78$14.001977-78 Ticket Price Graph1977-78 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 24May 23698,9501977-78 Skier Visit Graph
1976-771976-77 Ticket Price Graph1976-77 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 27May 151976-77 Skier Visit Graph
1975-76$12.001975-76 Ticket Price Graph1975-76 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 30May 51975-76 Skier Visit Graph
1974-75$11.001974-75 Ticket Price Graph1974-75 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 19May 12440,3451974-75 Skier Visit Graph
1973-74$10.001973-74 Ticket Price Graph1973-74 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 5April 30341,3191973-74 Skier Visit Graph
1972-73$9.501972-73 Ticket Price Graph1972-73 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 20April 28382,3551972-73 Skier Visit Graph
1971-72$9.501971-72 Ticket Price Graph1971-72 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 9May 18448,8091971-72 Skier Visit Graph
1970-71$9.501970-71 Ticket Price Graph1970-71 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 18May 211970-71 Skier Visit Graph
1969-70$9.001969-70 Ticket Price Graph1969-70 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 24May 41969-70 Skier Visit Graph
1960s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1968-69$8.501968-69 Ticket Price Graph1968-69 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 9May 101968-69 Skier Visit Graph
1967-68$7.001967-68 Ticket Price Graph1967-68 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 5April 71967-68 Skier Visit Graph
1966-67$7.001966-67 Ticket Price Graph1966-67 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 4May 2319,7561966-67 Skier Visit Graph
1965-661965-66 Ticket Price Graph1965-66 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 18May 18321,0001965-66 Skier Visit Graph
1964-65$6.251964-65 Ticket Price Graph$120.001964-65 Season Pass Price Graph19.2 daysNovember 21May 4250,0001964-65 Skier Visit Graph
1963-64$6.001963-64 Ticket Price Graph1963-64 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 3April 23240,0001963-64 Skier Visit Graph
1962-63$5.751962-63 Ticket Price Graph1962-63 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 8May 5193,0001962-63 Skier Visit Graph
1961-62$5.501961-62 Ticket Price Graph1961-62 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 2April 30118,0001961-62 Skier Visit Graph
1960-61$5.251960-61 Ticket Price Graph1960-61 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 14May 864,8501960-61 Skier Visit Graph
1959-60$4.501959-60 Ticket Price Graph1959-60 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 1239,8041959-60 Skier Visit Graph
1950s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1958-591958-59 Ticket Price Graph1958-59 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 13April 1613,0001958-59 Skier Visit Graph

1997-2006 skier visit figures include Pico

Visitor Memories
"First skied here in 64. Tickets were $6.00. Biggest thing in my young adult life. Thanks Killington. "
William Strait, Dec. 23, 2020
"Been skiing killington since early 70's. Best in the east. I've seen a lot of cahnges and most for the best. To many great days and memories with friends and family to list. ⛷⛷❄❄🌨🌨👍👍🍺🍺"
Leslie Heine, May. 11, 2020
"I was director of ski patrol in the late sixties !"
Ron Thompson, Feb. 2, 2017
"Killington has actually offered lift-serviced mountain biking since 1991 on the Killington Double chair and later K1 gondola, making next week's opening the start of the 25th season of mountain biking at Killington!"
Will Conroy, May. 20, 2016
"Monday, Feb 6. I was staying with friends at the Red Rob Inn (now the Killington Mountain School). We sat down for dinner at precisely 6:00 pm and we noticed it just started snowing...slow at first, but within minutes, it was snowing hard. Dinner was over by 7:00; we decided to walk to Charity's for drinks. There was well over six inches of snow on the ground as we walked there. When we left Charity's--around 10:00 pm, there was almost two feet of snow on the ground...and the access road was practically impassable. Cars were stuck everywhere. When we got back to the Red Rob, two ladies who left the hotel earlier that day (to drive home back to Boston)were inexplicably back at the Red Rob. 'Why did you guys return to Vermont?' we asked. 'They closed Massachusetts' was their answer. The turnpike was closed and the Massachusetts police said they would arrest any non-emergency motorists on the highways. When we woke up Tuesday morning, there was almost four feet of snow on the ground. Kenny Budzyna, the co-owner of the Red Rob calmed us down as we were dying to get to the mountain. Kenny advised us to sit tight: 'There's no rush to go the mountain,' he said. 'Too much snow and the lifts aren't open yet...they won't open until after 10 am.' He asked that we dig out our cars and empty the lot of cars so they can plow the lot. We got to the mountain around 10:30 am...and only a few lifts were running. The parking lot at Killington base was barely cleared of snow; just two bays, perhaps. We saw huge piles of snow that were foreign to us...we were amazed at all the snow there, being piled up as they plowed the lot. Killington 'regulars' were commenting that they never ever saw this much snow. They were still sweeping snow off the Killington Double chair. Most lifts sat still, or were moving very slowly so they could clear the mounds of snow off of each chair. The South Ridge triple didn't open until Wednesday...the mid-station two-bull wheel turn was buried in ten feet of drifts! We broke trails and snow all day Tuesday. The mountain was largely empty. Over 48 inches of snow fell. What a change from the icy conditions we experienced earlier that previous weekend. The snow remained excellent all week, through Friday. Boston Logan airport was closed for seven days. Killington remained empty even that following weekend because so many people couldn't get to the mountain. This was the winter of '78 where there were many storms..more than usual. I am told that this was the largest single dump in Killington history. I am glad that I was there...to experience nothing but powder and loose-pack powder day after day. The novice and many intermediate trails were almost impossible to ski until they were groomed...they weren't steep enough. A few trails (Conclusion, for example) had chest-deep snow. It was the most amazing ski day of my life at Killington...I've been skiing there for more than 40 years. Many other reminisce about that storm. I shall never forget the storm of my ski life...Feb 6-7, 1978. "
Robert Gedzelman, Jul. 8, 2014
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External Links
  • Killington Resort - official site
  • Killington Resort - a Skiernet Perspective
  • Killington Peak - FranklinSites.com Hiking Guide
  • Killington - Chairlift.org
  • KillingtonZone.com
  • Last updated: October 19, 2021

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